3D printer from the Arduino firm

arduino3d

Arduino is best known for its micro-controller of the same name and we’ve covered countless projects featuring the little electronic wonder over the years. With the 3D casino online printing industry making massive inroads in the do-it-yourself market, it’s not that surprising that the company behind one of the ultimate bits of hobbyist gear is releasing its own 3D printer.

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Raspberry Pi – The Pie for all Electronic Tinkering Buffs

Ever thought you would hold a computer as small as a credit card in your hand? Now, you can, the Raspberry Pi offers computer capability in a circuit board the size of your palm. Primarily, this small computer was built to help electronic and computer systems students learn to program, but now the Raspberry is being used for a variety of uses, and people from all over the world are really excited about owning at least one of these little guys.

Raspberry Pi

Raspberry Pi was developed in the UK and has a small processor, a very decent graphics accelerator and 256MB of RAM. While this may not make it the fastest computer in the world, it certainly has enough power to run many of the more common functions of a computer. Many find it very useful as something small to check email and surf the Internet.

Digital Buffs are Finding Many Ways to Use This Handy Device

Besides, being useful for basic computing, and for learning to program, a number of creative programmers are finding more unique ideas for the Raspberry Pi. Some electronic enthusiasts have successfully turned it into a media player for the TV, especially because among its basic functioning is the ability top lay media files.

Other digital enthusiasts find it makes the perfect alarm clock, especially because it can be programmed with multiple sounds. However, if you are really creative with electronics you could turn the Raspberry Pi into an automatic coffee pot initiator, or you could program it to automatically turn your lights on and off.

The Cost Makes It Even More Interesting

The Raspberry Pi computer is very interesting to hobbiest because of its size, low power consumption and capabilities, but especially because of its cost. The latest model sells for a fraction of the price of your typical dektop, and at approximately $25 per unit even without a case and peripherals, this makes an excellent tinkering computer.

Just keep in mind that these computers don’t come with a case, a keyboard or a power supply, although it can be powered by a cell phone power supply and you can connect a USB keyboard to it.

There aren’t very many places you can get the Raspberry Pi from just yet. After all, it is made by a non-profit organization. Still, you can order it online and get it in just a few days.

Five Reasons Why Arduino Simulator for iPhone is Fun

The Arduino Simulator for iPhone from Schogini Systems can be just the right app you would wish to own if you are ardent of using an open source single board microcontroller for a plethora of programming requisites. Adruino kits that are available these days and what many people end up buying are hardly explored as much as they should. Most aspiring programmers and those that have a penchant for electronics are likely to use the sample codes and make amends to customize the very same codes for different purposes. When the objective is to work on existing codes for multitude objectives then an Arduino Simulator for iPhone can be the best option.

IOS Arduino Simulator 4

Here is the link to the App’s page

Fve reasons why you should choose to own the Arduino Simulator for iPhone by Schogini Systems.

1. The Arduino Simulator is compatible with iPhone, iPad and iPod. The Full Pack version is compatible with iOS 3.1.3 and later whereas there is an upgraded version, Arduino simulator Full Pack 2X, works on iOS 3.2 and higher. If you have an iPad then you can very well opt for the upgraded version which would bring in more features.

2. Whichever version of Arduino Simulator for iPhone and iPad you choose to buy it is a one off purchase and all future add ons or upgrades would be available to you for free. It is a onetime small fee to explore the fascinating world of Arduino.

3. The prices are relatively much more congenial for people, especially students and kids. At $7.99 and $9.99 for the two versions and the prices being a one off charge, Arduino Simulator from Schogini Systems is definitely affordably priced.

4. The Arduino Simulator offers the exact feel as you would have while working on a kit. The app brings together all the popular and even some rare functions and features. Without the requisite of any hardware or software, the Arduino Simulator can allow you to make changes to the codes in regards to delay, pin number and state. Users and developers get the full breadboard with 14 LED pins and the luxury to work on various types of programs. There are several touch and drag features while working on the wiring and you can also change input and output settings as a program would demand.

5. With a horde of sensors including ultrasonic distance sensor, PIR sensor, knock sensor and touch sensor among others, the entire virtual experience can get as real as it can be.

Here is the link to the App’s page

GPS Shield

Adding GPS to your Arduino has never been easier. Multiple GPS receivers attach easily to the shield, and with the example sketch (check below), you will be able to locate your exact position within a few meters. Here’s where we are. GPS also gives you amazingly accurate time!

A connector for the popular EM-406 GPS receiver is populated on the board, and footprints for EM-408 and EB-85A connectors are also made available (connectors are not included and can be found below in the related items). There is also a spot for the UP501 GPS module. The regular GPS pins (RX, TX, PPS, etc.) are also broken out to a 10-pin 0.1″ pitch header, and a small protoyping area is also provided.

The DLINE/UART switch switches the GPS module’s input/output between Arduino’s standard TX/RX pins or any digital pins on the Arduino (default setting uses pins 3 and 2 connected to TX and RX, respectively). The DLINE/UART switch must be set to DLINE in order to upload code through the Arduino IDE.

The shield also includes the footprint for a 12mm coin cell battery holder to provide battery backup to the optional EB-85A GPS module.An ON/OFF switch is included which controls power to the GPS module. Additionally, the Arduino reset switch is also brought out.

Note: GPS modules are not included with the GPS Shield, and only the EM-406 connector is populated. Headers are also not installed or included, we recommend the 6 and 8-pin stackable headers.

 

 

Features:

• EM-406 connector populated

• EM-408 and EB-85A connector footprints provided and connected for optional use

• UP501 connector and footprint

• Coin cell battery socket footprint provided and connected for optional battery backup of EB-85A GPS module

• Standard Arduino sized shield

• Prototyping area

• GPS serial and PPS signals broken out to a 0.1″ header for additional device connections

• Arduino reset button

• DLINE/UART switch controls serial communications

• ON/OFF switch controls power to GPS module

 

regards: www.sparkfun.com

SatUplink Shield

SPOT is a service that makes adventures off the beaten path a little safer by providing a way to check in, send “I’m ok” messages or call for help via satellite. That’s all very useful if you’re going out into the wild beyond the reach of cellular and WiFi, but what if your Arduino is going and leaving you behind in civilization? Wouldn’t it be nice if it could take advantage of this technology to send you an e-mail or text message from the middle of nowhere?

This shield allows your Arduino to access the awesome satellite communication technology in the SPOT Connect module. Simply dismantle your SPOT Connect device and carefully pull it apart like an Oreo cookie, the remaining headers will mate with the headers on the SatUplink Shield allowing your Arduino to talk to the heavens and broadcast short text messages (41 characters) to and from almost anywhere!

 

regards: www.sparkfun.com

VoiceBox Shield

The VoiceBox Shield can be mounted on top of your Arduino board to give it access to all of the capabilities of the SpeakJetvoice and sound synthesizer. The Voice Box Shield uses the SpeakJet chip to convert serial commands into a great robot-sounding voice.

Populated on the VoiceBox Shield are the SpeakJet IC, a two stage audio amplifier with a potentiometer to set the gain and a standard 3.5mm audio output jack. Simply connect a speaker to the output jack and get your Arduino-bot talking with very minimal work!

You can control the SpeakJet through either its serial line, or the eight event input lines which are connected to digital pins 5-12. A 3-way jumper allows you to connect either the software (D2) or hardware (D1) TX pin of the Arduino to the SpeakJet’s serial input.

Also included on the shield are a grid of 0.1″ pitch through-holes for prototyping as well as the Arduino’s reset button. Headers are not included, we recommend the 6 and 8-pin stackable headers.

 

regards : www.sparkfun.com

Arduino Ethernet Shield

The Arduino Ethernet Shield allows an Arduino board to connect to the internet. It is based on the Wiznet W5100 ethernet chip providing a network (IP) stack capable of both TCP and UDP. The Arduino Ethernet Shield supports up to four simultaneous socket connections. Use the Ethernet library to write sketches which connect to the internet via a standard RJ45 Ethernet jack using the shield.

The latest revision of the shield adds a micro-SD card slot, which can be used to store files for serving over the network. It is compatible with the Arduino Uno and Mega (using the Ethernet library). You can access the on-board SD card slot using the SD library which is included in the current Arduino build.

The latest revision of the shield also includes a reset controller, to ensure that the W5100 Ethernet module is properly reset on power-up. Previous revisions of the shield were not compatible with the Mega and need to be manually reset after power-up. The reset button on the shield resets both the W5100 and the Arduino board.

Arduino communicates with both the W5100 and SD card using the SPI bus (through the ICSP header). This is on digital pins 11, 12, and 13 on the Duemilanove and pins 50, 51, and 52 on the Mega. On both boards, pin 10 is used to select the W5100 and pin 4 for the SD card. These pins cannot be used for general i/o. On the Mega, the hardware SS pin, 53, is not used to select either the W5100 or the SD card, but it must be kept as an output or the SPI interface won’t work.

Note that because the W5100 and SD card share the SPI bus, only one can be active at a time. If you are using both peripherals in your program, this should be taken care of by the corresponding libraries. If you’re not using one of the peripherals in your program, however, you’ll need to explicitly deselect it. To do this with the SD card, set pin 4 as an output and write a high to it. For the W5100, set digital pin 10 as a high output.

 

Regards: www.sparkfun.com

 

Music Instrument Shield

The Musical Instrument Shield is an easy way to add great sounding MIDI sound to your next Arduino project. This board is built around the VS1053 MP3 and MIDI codec IC, wired in MIDI mode. Simply connect a speaker/stereo/pair of headphones to the 1/8″ stereo jack on the shied and pass the proper serial commands to the IC and you’ll be playing music in no time!

The VS1053 contains two large tonebanks including various piano, woodwinds, brass, synth, SFX and percussion sounds. The shield is also capable of playing several tones simultaneously (maximum polyphony of up to 31 sounds!). Take a look at our example code to get an idea of how easy it is to add musical zest to your next Arduino gadget.

In this version, we’re using a better regulator, corrected the speaker connectors, and have the reset pin pulled high. We’ve also included solder jumpers for pin 3 and 4 so they’re selectable.

regards: www.sparkfun.com

 

 

Gameduino

         Gameduino is a game adapter for Arduino (or anything else with an SPI interface) built as a single shield that stacks up on top of the Arduino and has plugs for a VGA monitor and stereo speakers. The sound and graphics are definitely old-school, but thanks to the latest FPGA technology, the sprite capabilities are a step above those in machines from the past. The adapter is controlled via SPI read/write operations, and looks to the CPU like a 32Kbyte RAM. (Unlike many 8-bit machines, there are no restrictions on when you can access this RAM). There is even a handy reference poster (which you can download below) showing how the whole system works.

 

Features:

• Video output is 400×300 pixels in 512 colors

• All color processed internally at 15-bit precision

• Compatible with any standard VGA monitor (800×600 @ 72Hz)

• Background Graphics

◦ 512×512 pixel character background

◦ 256 characters, each with independent 4 color palette

◦ pixel-smooth X-Y wraparound scroll

• Foreground Graphics

◦ each sprite is 16×16 pixels with per-pixel transparency

◦ each sprite can use 256, 16 or 4 colors

◦ four-way rotate and flip

◦ 96 sprites per scan-line, 1536 texels per line

◦ pixel-perfect sprite collision detection

• Audio output is a stereo 12-bit frequency synthesizer

• 64 Independent Voices 10-8000 Hz

• Per-Voice Sine Wave or White Noise

• Sample Playback Channel

 

Regards: www.sparkfun.com

Arduino Microcontroller Feature Comparison

Arduino is fast becoming one of the most popular microcontrollers used in robotics.There are many different types of Arduino microcontrollers which differ not only in design and features, but also in size and processing capabilities. In this article, you’ll understand the differences between the Arduino Microcontrollers (as of 2012). There are many features that are common to all Arduino boards, making them very versatile. All Arduino boards are based around the ATMEGA AVR series microcontrollers from ATMEL which feature both analog and digital pins. Arduino also created software which is compatible with all Arduino microcontrollers. The software, also called “Arduino”, can be used to program any of the Arduino microcontrollers by selecting them from a drop-down menu. Being open source, and based around C, Arduino users are not necessarily restricted to this software, and can use a variety of other software to program the microcontrollers. There are many additional manufacturers who use the open-source schematics provided by Arduino to make their own boards (either identical to the original, or with variations to add to the functionality). For example, the most popular board, the Diecimilla / Duemilanove (and now the Uno) has dozens of look-alike boards from other suppliers which differ slightly (different USB port, color etc) from the original.

Arduino Mini / Mini Lite

The smallest Arduino product is the Arduino Mini Light which is a 24-pin microcontroller without any connectors soldered. The unit features 8 analog pins and 14 digital pins. The module is based around the ATMEGA168 processor. The only different between the Arduino Mini and the Arduino Mini Light is that the Arduino Mini has pre-soldered pin headers. The Mini lineup will be changed and will likely include the new 32U4 processor.

  • Arduino Microcontroller Feature ComparisonMicrocontroller ATmega328
  • Operating Voltage 5V
  • Input Voltage 7-9 V
  • Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 8 (of which 4 are broken out onto pins)
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • Flash Memory 32 KB (2 KB used by bootloader)
  • SRAM 2 KB
  • EEPROM 1KB
  • Clock Speed 16 MHz

The Mini and Mini lite are really intended to be used with breadboards. In order to program these, you need a separate USB to serial adapter.

Arduino Pro Mini 3.3V / Pro Mini 5V

The Arduino Pro Mini 8MHz and 16MHz are also breadboard mountable and are a bit longer than the Arduino Mini. The Pro Mini 8MHz operates on 3.3V while the 16Mhz operates at 5V. Both feature 6 analog I/O and 14 digital I/O. The manufacturer has marked the back of the PCB to indicate which is which.

  • Microcontroller ATmega328Arduino Microcontroller Feature Comparison
  • Operating Voltage 3.3V or 5V (depending on model)
  • Input Voltage 3.35 -12 V (3.3V model) or 5 – 12 V (5V model)
  • Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 6
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • Flash Memory 16 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader)
  • SRAM 2 KB
  • EEPROM 1 KB
  • Clock Speed 8 MHz (3.3V model), 16 MHz (5V model)

The Pro is one of the fastest and smallest (and still one of the lightest) of the  boards.

Arduino Nano / Nano Lite

The last breadboard mountable Arduino is the Arduino Nano. This microcontroller distinguishes itself from the others by having the USB to serial chip and connector onboard. The Nano has 8 analog pins and 14 digital pins. There are the ISCP headers to re-flash the ATMega chip. There is also the Arduino Nano Lite which does not include the downward facing pin headers.

  • Microcontroller Atmel ATmega328Arduino Microcontroller Feature Comparison
  • Operating Voltage (logic level) 5 V
  • Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12 V
  • Input Voltage (limits) 6-20 V
  • Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 8
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • Flash Memory 32 KB (2KB used by bootloader)
  • SRAM 2 KB
  • EEPROM 1 KB

The Nano was the first mini breadboard-compatible board to have onboard USB.

Arduino Fio

The Arduino Fio is a bit of a one-off board and is essentially an Arduino Mini with a built-in LiPo charger and XBee headers.

  • Microcontroller ATmega328P
  • Operating Voltage 3.3 V
  • Input Voltage 3.35-12 V
  • Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 8 (10 bit resolution)
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • Flash Memory 32 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader)
  • SRAM 3.3 KB
  • EEPROM 1024 bytes
  • Clock Speed 8 MHz

Arduino LilyPad / Simple LilyPad

Next is the Arduino Lilypad. The Lilypad stands out from all other microcontrollers because of its round, purple PCB. The lilypad was originally intended to be sewn into clothing, though enthusiasts have found many other applications for it. If you’re cautious, the Lilypad can also be washed along with the clothing. The Lilypad requires as little as 2.7V to work.

  • Microcontroller ATmega168VArduino Microcontroller Feature Comparison or 328V
  • Operating Voltage 2.7-5.5 V
  • Input Voltage 2.7-5.5 V
  • Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 6
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • Flash Memory 16 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader)
  • SRAM 1 KB
  • EEPROM 512 bytes
  • Clock Speed 8 MHz

The Lilypad is intended for use with clothing and fabric-related projects. There are many Lilypad accessories (LEDs, buzzers, sensors etc.) in the same format which can be connected via conductive fabric.

Arduino Leonardo

The next Arduino boards have the classic Arduino board shape and can’t be mounted on breadboards. The smallest in this line is the Arduino Leonardo. The Leonardo is available with or without shield stacking headers.

  • Microcontroller ATmega32U4 (onboard USB Transceiver)
  • Operating Voltage 5 V
  • Input Voltage 2.7-5.5 V
  • Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 12 (10 bit resolution)
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • Flash Memory 32 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader)
  • SRAM 3.3 KB
  • EEPROM 1024 bytes
  • Clock Speed 16 MHz

The Leonardo is (currently) the newest Arduino to use the 32U4 chip and lowers the price of Arduino boards.

Arduino Pro 3.3V / Pro 5V

A very similar board to the Leonardo is the Arduino Pro. Some of the advantages to this board are its operating voltage range, which is 3.3 to 12V, its smaller footprint and lighter weight. The Pro doesn’t come with pin headers and although it’s smaller than other Arduino boards, it’s still compatible with Arduino shields.Arduino Microcontroller Feature Comparison

  • Microcontroller ATmega168
  • Operating Voltage 3.3V
  • Input Voltage 3.35 -12 V
  • Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 6
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • Flash Memory 16 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader)
  • SRAM 1 KB
  • EEPROM 512 bytes
  • Clock Speed 8 MHz

Arduino Diecimilla / Duemilanove /Uno

Next is the most popular of the Arduino microcontrollers; the Uno. The Uno has almost the same appearance as its predecessor, the Duemilanove, but uses an ATMega8 for USB to serial conversion. The Duemilanove was previously the Diecimilla which had a less powerful ATMega168 chip. These boards come pre-assembled and ready to use. The Duemilanove is based around the ATMEGA328 chip while the Diecimilla used the ATMEGA128.

  • Microcontroller ATmega168Arduino Microcontroller Feature Comparison or 328
  • Operating Voltage 5V
  • Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V
  • Input Voltage (limits) 6-20V
  • Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 6
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA
  • Flash Memory 16 KB (ATmega168) or 32 KB (ATmega328)
  • of which 2 KB used by bootloader

On one side of the board there are 14 digital input/output pins as well as a ground pin and a reference pin which acts as voltage reference for the analog pins. Pin zero doubles as serial input, and pin 1 doubles for serial output. On the other side of the board, you’ll find 6 analog pins, as well as a voltage input pin, two ground pins and a reset pin. The board also has both a 3.3V and 5V output pins. You can power the board any of three ways: directly via the USB port, using the power connector, or the Vin and ground pins. The ATMEGA chip is removable from the board. This is especially useful if you have fried the processor and need to replace it, or you can use the board alone as a USB to serial interface. R3 of the Uno adds two new pins on the digital side: SDA and SCL

Arduino Ethernet / Ethernet PoE

The Arduino Ethernet is essentially a normal Arduino Uno where the ATMega8 chip and USB plug are changed for an Ethernet port. The PoE (power over ethernet) version means you don’t need a separate power supply (wall adapter for example), although your router must also be PoE compatible. A similar setup can be done using a standard shield-compatible Arduino and an Ethernet shield.

  • Microcontroller ATmega328
  • Operating Voltage 5 V
  • Input Voltage 7-12 V (36 to 57V PoE)
  • Digital I/O Pins 10* (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 6 (10 bit resolution)
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • Flash Memory 32 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader)
  • SRAM 3.3 KB
  • EEPROM 1024 bytes
  • Clock Speed 16 MHz

*In order to use the Ethernet, pins 10 to 13 are reserved.

Arduino Bluetooth

Next on the list is the Arduino Bluetooth. The layout of the board is identical to that of the Duemilanove, but with one big difference: the Arduino Bluetooth board replaces the USB plug with a Bluetooth module, meaning you program it remotely. Take note that the board has different power requirements than the Duemilanove and doesn’t have a 3.3V output pin. The 9V output pin indicated on the board is not actually functional.

  • Microcontroller ATmega328Arduino Microcontroller Feature Comparison
  • Operating Voltage 5V
  • Input Voltage 1.2-5.5 V
  • Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 8 (4 are broken out onto pins)
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • Flash Memory 16 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader)
  • SRAM 2 KB
  • EEPROM 51 KB
  • Clock Speed 16 MHz

 

Arduino Mega 1280 / 2560

The most recent addition to the Arduino lineup is the Arduino MEGA. This board is physically larger than all the other boards and offers significantly more digital and analog pins. The MEGA uses a different processor allowing greater program size and more.

  • Microcontroller ATmega1280Arduino Microcontroller Feature Comparison or 2560
  • Operating Voltage 5V
  • Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V
  • Input Voltage (limits) 6-20V
  • Digital I/O Pins 54 (of which 14 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 16
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA
  • Flash Memory 128 KB or 256KB
  • SRAM 8 KB
  • EEPROM 4 KB
  • Clock Speed 16 MHz

Arduino Mega ADK

The Arduino ADK is intended to connect to Google Android based devices. Note that a cell phone will attempt to draw power from the board (often more than a USB connected to a computer can supply); an external battery or wall adapter is highly suggested.

  • Microcontroller ATmega1280 or 2560
  • Operating Voltage 5V
  • Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V
  • Input Voltage (limits) 6-20V
  • Digital I/O Pins 54 (of which 14 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins 16
  • DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
  • DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA
  • Flash Memory 128 KB or 256KB
  • SRAM 8 KB
  • EEPROM 4 KB
  • Clock Speed 16 MHz